The Lonely Life of Biddy Weir – Lesley Allen *BOOK TOUR*

A stark but uplifting story of bullying and redemption, for anyone who’s ever been a weirdo.

Almost too terrified to grip the phone, Biddy Weir calls a daytime television show.

The subject is bullying, and Biddy has a story to tell.

Abandoned by her mother as a baby, Biddy lives in her own little world, happy to pass her time watching the birds – until Alison Fleming joins her school.

Popular and beautiful, but with a dangerous, malevolent streak, Alison quickly secures the admiration of her fellow students. All except one. And Alison doesn’t take kindly to people who don’t fit her mould . . .

A story of abuse and survival, of falling down and of starting again, and of one woman’s battle to learn to love herself for who she is, The Lonely Life of Biddy Weir is Lesley Allen’s startlingly honest debut novel, perfect for fans of Rowan Coleman and Julie Cohen.

The most frightening revelation of this novel is that for someone to describe so accurately the deep-rooted level of such harsh bullying must have endured it themselves.

Lesley Allen has written a heart breaking emotive novel, with such talented writing you engage with and react to, the tales so horrific you cry for Biddy as you witness her misunderstanding and confusion around her situation and feel her pain she consumes on a daily basis.

Before Alison Flemming Biddy lived in her own existence ignorant to being different and so very unique.

The experiences bestowed upon Biddy are harsh with the naivety and vulnerability of Biddy being abused.  Her innocence is overwhelming and the reality of it is that the situation she finds herself trapped within is none of her own doing.

During parts of the story I got angry, throwing the book down and shouting outloud ‘how could they’ at my family, I was incensed that the people who could help turned a blind eye and those who tried became penalised for wanting to make a difference. Alison Flemming needed her comeuppance years before it was finally received.

I had an Alison Flemming in my childhood, my Alison came in many types and different forms and at times, even now, still raises her ugly head. Confidence is a brittle thing, something so easy to shatter instantly, after taking the slow journey years upon years to construct and build a strong place, only to be destroyed by some bitter individual with a harsh tongue and jealous approach.

Why are the Alison Flemming of the worlds be allowed to exist, what can they offer other than cruel destruction, misery, pain and fear?

I understood Biddy’s pain, I cried her hot tears and felt that lump in her throat she so desperately wanted to swallow. I know what it feels like to be stood invisible in a room surrounded by Alison Flemming clones and cronies and for those of authority to turn away, close their eyes or join the parade. All those times hearing the same repetitive drivel of ‘they are only jealous’ or ‘they feel threatened’ yet they break you to the point of worthlessness and fail to understand how someone could be jealous of the insignificant husk of a person you have now become after being brainwashed over decades of you pathetic existence.

Yes I understand Biddy all too well and nobody deserves to be treated in such a way.

The anger I felt was real, that old enemy of frustration reared his ugly head once again, never doing me any favours, and tying me in knots as I read page upon page of relentless bullying from some nasty piece of work who deserved a very hard smack.

Biddy’s life is not always so lonely, we are introduced to Terri, who is the guardian angel that Biddy needs.

The relationship slowly developes and grows over time, fragmented and disjointed but worthy of the invested time spent in the end. Terri is Biddy’s saviour, the one to teach her how to appreciate herself, believe in herself and undo the many years of brainwashing she had so frequently received.

The final chapter had me in tears, covered in goosebumps and with every hair standing on end.

I made a disgrace of myself on public transport but for Biddy it was worth it. She became my hero.

This is an excellent book, a very poignant story and very real. It is emotive and thought-provoking and uncomfortable at times but very worthy of your interest. I recommend it wholeheartedly.

From the Author; Living with the Character

My novel is about a girl who is mercilessly bullied from the age of ten until a catastrophic event removes her from the grip of her bullies five years later. Biddy is a loner. She gazes at the world from the outside in, observing life from a distance, but not actively participating in it. Her mother abandoned her, her father is a social recluse, she has no friends, and she lives in fear of Alison Flemming, the girl who bullies her on a daily basis.

I, on the other hand, have an amazing family, a wealth of wonderful friends, and live a busy, active, full-on life. And I have never been bullied, at least not in the way that Biddy is. Not even close. Oh, over the years, I’ve encountered many an Alison-type character, experienced intimidation in the workplace, and was frequently teased as a child because of my curly hair. But that’s the height of it.

Many people who read the book ask if Biddy is me. She isn’t. In fact, our curly hair is the only thing we have in common. But sometimes I feel that I know Biddy better than I know myself. I’ve lived with her inside my head for many years now, ever since she popped up in a short story and quietly, but firmly, demanded my attention. It took me a long time to tease her story out, but that’s how Biddy is.

We’ve been through a lot together: financial pressures, two house moves, the death of my father, the on-going fall-out from the breakup of my marriage, and, most notably for Biddy, a publication false-start when a deal I received for the book eight years ago fell through at the eleventh hour. She tolerated my apathy during the times when, poleaxed by grief after losing my dad and floored by the collapse of the first publishing deal, I thought I would never write again. She didn’t complain when I set her aside and began to slowly write some other material, and she welcomed me with open arms when I decided to tweak her story, and try again. And when I was at the lowest point in my life following my marriage breakup, she gave me back my dream of publication, just when I needed it most.

Since the day we heard that Twenty7 Books were going to publish the book, Biddy has been a permanent feature in my life. I talk about her daily, I write about her, I even find myself talking to her sometimes! She has changed my life, and I’m elated that this time, the publication ending has been a happy one. The day I held the book in my hand for the first time was the second best day of my life – the first belongs to my 18-year-old baby girl. And now my book baby has taken flight. Biddy’s story is finally out there for the readers of the world to make of what they will. It’s a nerve wrecking time! I hope they like her. Actually, I hope they love her just as much as I do.

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s